Late Bloomer

ex0skeletal:

Fun shark attack facts:

  • In 1996, toilets injured 43,000 Americans a year. Sharks injured 13.
  • In 1996, 2,600 Americans were injured by room fresheners. Sharks injured 13.
  • In 1996, buckets and pails injured almost 11,000 Americans. Sharks injured 13.
  • For every human killed by a shark, humans kill approximately two million sharks.

Conclusions:

  1. Humans are assholes.
  2. Sharks are not assholes.
  3. Apparently everyone in 1996 lived in a real-life infomercial.
austinkleon:

William Styron, Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness

Last night @craigmod tweeted:


  If you cannot begin to empathize with someone taking their own life, I suggest reading Darkness Visible… Styron’s book is only 80 pages. Truly an important read


I picked it up last night and finished it today. Some bits, below.

On the inadequacy of the word “depression”:


  When I was first aware that I had been laid low by the disease, I felt a need, among other things, to register a strong protest against the word “depression.” Depression, most people know, used to be termed “melancholia,” a word which appears in English as the year 1303 and crops up more than once in Chaucer, who in his usade seemed to be aware of its pathological nuances. “Melancholia” would still appear to be a far more apt and evocative word for the blacker forms of the disorder, but it was usurped by a noun with a blank tonality and lacking any magisterial presence, used indifferently to describe an economic decline or a rut in the ground, a true wimp of a word for such a major illness.


How part of the problem with depression is that it’s somewhat beyond description, and almost impossible to fathom for those of us who haven’t experienced it:


  Depression is a disorder of mood, so mysteriously painful and elusive in the way it becomes known to the self—to the mediating intellect—as to verge close to being beyond description… it has to be emphasized that if the pain were readily describable most of the countless sufferers from this ancient affliction would have been able to confidently depict for their friends and loved ones (even their physicians) some of the actual dimensions of their torment, and perhaps elicit a comprehension that has been generally lacking; such incomprehension has usually been due not to a failure of sympathy but to the basic inability of healthy people to imagine a form of torment so alien to everyday experience.


Styron, however, does what he can to describe it to us:


  The pain is unrelenting, and what makes the condition intolerable is the foreknowledge that no remedy will come — not in a day, an hour, a month, or a minute. If there is mild relief, one knows that it is only temporary; more pain will follow. It is hopelessness even more than pain that crushes the soul. So the decision-making of daily life involves not, as in normal affairs, shifting from one annoying situation to another less annoying- or from discomfort to relative comfort, or from boredom to activity- but moving from pain to pain. One does not abandon, even briefly, one’s bed of nails, but is attached to it wherever one goes.


Recommended.

austinkleon:

William Styron, Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness

Last night @craigmod tweeted:

If you cannot begin to empathize with someone taking their own life, I suggest reading Darkness Visible… Styron’s book is only 80 pages. Truly an important read

I picked it up last night and finished it today. Some bits, below.

On the inadequacy of the word “depression”:

When I was first aware that I had been laid low by the disease, I felt a need, among other things, to register a strong protest against the word “depression.” Depression, most people know, used to be termed “melancholia,” a word which appears in English as the year 1303 and crops up more than once in Chaucer, who in his usade seemed to be aware of its pathological nuances. “Melancholia” would still appear to be a far more apt and evocative word for the blacker forms of the disorder, but it was usurped by a noun with a blank tonality and lacking any magisterial presence, used indifferently to describe an economic decline or a rut in the ground, a true wimp of a word for such a major illness.

How part of the problem with depression is that it’s somewhat beyond description, and almost impossible to fathom for those of us who haven’t experienced it:

Depression is a disorder of mood, so mysteriously painful and elusive in the way it becomes known to the self—to the mediating intellect—as to verge close to being beyond description… it has to be emphasized that if the pain were readily describable most of the countless sufferers from this ancient affliction would have been able to confidently depict for their friends and loved ones (even their physicians) some of the actual dimensions of their torment, and perhaps elicit a comprehension that has been generally lacking; such incomprehension has usually been due not to a failure of sympathy but to the basic inability of healthy people to imagine a form of torment so alien to everyday experience.

Styron, however, does what he can to describe it to us:

The pain is unrelenting, and what makes the condition intolerable is the foreknowledge that no remedy will come — not in a day, an hour, a month, or a minute. If there is mild relief, one knows that it is only temporary; more pain will follow. It is hopelessness even more than pain that crushes the soul. So the decision-making of daily life involves not, as in normal affairs, shifting from one annoying situation to another less annoying- or from discomfort to relative comfort, or from boredom to activity- but moving from pain to pain. One does not abandon, even briefly, one’s bed of nails, but is attached to it wherever one goes.

Recommended.

septagonstudios:

Tumblr Of The Week: generic-art
We are always on the look out for great Tumblrs. We are huge fans of art and design related blogs but sometimes you just need one of those Tumblrs that posts a little bit of everything. Generic is one of those blogs! He posts everything from art, gifs, photography, music, vintage stuff and even animals. He has a cool archive with a lot of interesting images. I would compare his blog to something unique you’d find at an antique sale or garage sale. It’s a pretty awesome blog, stop by and visit his site, you might even find some hidden treasures.
Art by: Larry Carlson http://larrycarlson.com/

septagonstudios:

Tumblr Of The Week: generic-art

We are always on the look out for great Tumblrs. We are huge fans of art and design related blogs but sometimes you just need one of those Tumblrs that posts a little bit of everything. Generic is one of those blogs! He posts everything from art, gifs, photography, music, vintage stuff and even animals. He has a cool archive with a lot of interesting images. I would compare his blog to something unique you’d find at an antique sale or garage sale. It’s a pretty awesome blog, stop by and visit his site, you might even find some hidden treasures.

Art by: Larry Carlson http://larrycarlson.com/

cockend:

The mummified heart is said to be that of vampire Auguste Delagrance, responsible for the deaths of more than forty people back in the 1900, a period of vampirism in the USA. When he was identified, Delagrance was hunted down by a Romano Catholic priest and a Voodoo Hougan, and was destroyed in 1912. (x)

This is fucking Rad

(Source: welcometothe1jungle)

Our bodies are prisons for our souls, our skin and blood the iron bars of confinement. 

The Fountain, 2006, directed by Darren Aronofsky. 

(Source: abbaskiarostamis)

You only demand clarity because you’re too comfortable within your vagueness; You only feel insufficient because you’re extremely fearful of unconditionally caring.
- Albert Camus, Notebooks 1951-1959  (via ig-narus)

(Source: stxxz.us)